1 Small Tweak to Keeping Your Online Presence FRESH!

Now that the new year is here and you are back in the swing of things after the holiday season, it is time to do a quick check to make sure that your online presence is nice and fresh, and doesn’t seem outdated. In this post you will learn the one small thing that you must do to keep your business from looking like yesterday’s news. Continue reading

024 – 5 Power Tips for Using Facebook Groups to Grow Your Business

Are you using Facebook Groups to increase your exposure and get yourself in front of tons of new people? If not, you should be! On this episode of the Growing Your Holistic Business Podcast I will share with you five powerful tips that will help you get better results, be seen by more people, and increase the engagement you get from Facebook groups.

5 Power Tips for using Facebook Groups to grow your business.

024: 5 Power Tips for Using Facebook Groups to Grow Your Business

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Marketing Mistakes – Comment Bombing Other People’s Posts on Social Media

Social media can be a wonderfully productive place to market your services… if you approach it from a heart-centered place and you keep yourself in the light! Don't comment bomb other people's posts!Unfortunately, there are a lot of marketing tactics out there that are not so heart-centered, and the truth is that some of them can do you and your practice more harm than good. In this post I’m going to talk about one of those tactics, ‘comment bombing’. We’ll look at what it is, and what to do if it happens to you.

What is comment bombing?

Comment bombing is the act of posting an irrelevant comment, usually an advertisement, in a comment thread underneath someone’s post on a social media site. It is done to steal readers who are interested in the original post.

Let me show you a recent example I ran across on Facebook. I have blacked out the names and website info of the people involved because my intent with this post isn’t to shame or name anyone, but rather to make you aware that this happens and let you know what to do if it happens to you.

This is an actual screenshot of a comment bomber in action, taken from a spiritual advertising group on Facebook.

As you can see, Jennifer posted a text ad in the group, offering a nice deal on a package of readings, (which seems wildly underpriced to me, but that’s another conversation, lol ) Anyway, Jennifer posts her ad, hoping to entice some group members to take advantage of her offer, and then… along comes Charlotte.

An recent example of comment bombing.

A comment bomber in action.

Charlotte leaves a comment on Jennifer’s post, but it’s not the kind of comment you would expect. You might expect someone to inquire about Jennifer’s readings, or maybe to leave a word of encouragement, like “Wow, great offer”.

But nope.

Charlotte the Comment Bomber had other plans.

Charlotte comments on Jennifer’s advertising post by offering readers her own FREE reading, and shares a link to her website.

Say what?

I don’t even know where to begin with this. I mean, are you kidding me? How un-spiritual can you possibly be? In the same amount of time it took to piggy-back on someone else’s post, Charlotte could have posted her own advertisement. Remember, this happened in an advertising group.

Now, I’ll be honest. At first I thought Charlotte was just misguided. Perhaps she read or heard that this was a good idea to try. After all, there are a lot of marketing coaches out there teaching some crazy stuff – stuff that’s not very heart-centered. So maybe she’s doing this because no one told her it wasn’t a nice way to market.

So I click through to the link she shared and quickly realize that there is much more going on here than just simple comment bombing. The website she links to has her picture on it, but is using a totally different name. So, I go back to Facebook, where with two clicks I do a quick Google image search on Charlotte’s profile picture. Surprise, surprise! Google shows me pages and pages of results with Charlotte’s photo, dozens of them from various stock photo sites, the rest from sites and articles that have used that same stock photo.

Oh yeah, that Google image search also showed a bunch of Facebook profiles using that stock image.

This is one of those sleazy tactics that I just don’t understand, and in this case it turned out to be a darker mess than I originally thought. I’m not saying that the person on the other end of that website doesn’t have amazing gifts. They very well may. But the way they are marketing is probably doing them more harm than good.

Unfortunately, this is only one example of comment bombing that I’ve seen lately. There are many others out there. They show up on Facebook, YouTube, Instagram, and pretty much any site that allows commenting. People also comment bomb the comments on people’s blogs!

Anyway, I’m pretty sure that if you are reading this post you are not the type of person to jump on someone else’s post for your own purposes! So let’s talk about what to do if someone comment bombs one of your social media posts.

 

What should you do if you get comment bombed?

Hopefully none of your social media posts will ever be comment bombed. But if it happens to you there are a couple of things you can do.

Delete, Block, and Report – You definitely want to delete the offending comment, that’s for sure. But you also want to take steps to prevent it from happening again, so you should block the person if you are able, and report it if there is someone to report it to. Taking a screenshot before you delete it will often help you report it if you need to.

It shouldn’t happen on your own blog, because you should have your blog set so that you have to manually approve comments, but if for some reason it does happen, you can always block people by email address.

If it happens on Facebook you can block people from seeing and commenting on your posts. If it happens in a group you should let the group admin or moderator know what happened. Especially in active groups, admins don’t always have time to read every post and every comment. But most want to know when people are spamming or scamming in their groups.

Whatever you do, don’t let your emotions get the best of you. At first you might feel offended or violated or angry. That’s okay, just breathe through it and then take action to clean things up.

You’ll never be able to avoid all the jerks and trolls and mean people in the world, they are going to show up. Maybe it’s to help us learn a lesson, maybe it’s just because there are so many of them, but all you can do is choose to take the heart-centered path in all you do.

 

Want to hang out with other cool practitioners and have fun sharing, learning, and growing our businesses together? Come join the Growing Your Holistic Business Facebook group!

 

Bob-headshot-240x300Bob Crawford is a holistic business coach, helping lightworkers, healers, and other spiritual entrepreneurs learn how to attract more clients and make more money, while still remaining authentic and heart-centered. “Because growing your practice should be as fun and rewarding as the work your were called to do!”

 

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3 Ways to Improve Your Email Opt-in Process

No matter how irresistible your offer is, you still need a good system in place to walk folks through your email opt-in process and welcome them into your world. Unfortunately though, some people who are interested are going to get lost along the way. For a variety of reasons some people won’t ever make it onto your email list and won’t ever see your content. Here are 3 ways you can improve your email opt-in process and make sure that the experience is as easy and as rewarding as possible for your new subscribers.

#1 – Test, Test, Test

checkBefore you release it to the world, sign up for your own offer so that you can see first hand exactly what your peeps see as they go from filling out your opt-in form to consuming your content. Surprisingly, even the pros forget to test things once in a while. Make sure that everything works just the way you want it to.

True story: I once created an opt-in page for a free teleclass. I spent hours and hours putting it together. When I was finished, I threw the signup form on the page, and then promoted it like crazy. Then I did what everyone does, I sat in front of my email program, hitting the refresh button over and over and over, waiting to see the signups roll in.

But none came in. I waited. I hit refresh a few more times. I waited some more. Nothing. Now I’m worried. Is there something wrong with my topic? Is it not interesting enough? Maybe I wasn’t clear about what I was going to cover?

More waiting. More refreshing. More nothing.

Then, finally, an email came in that blew me away. Someone wrote to tell me that they tried to sign up for my free class, but the opt-in page wasn’t working. I couldn’t believe it. I had never tested the opt-in. So I lost out on an untold number of people who might have wanted to learn from me. Because for every person who takes the time to write and let you know something isn’t working, there will be 10, or 50, or 100 people who just move on. Your page doesn’t work, your opt-in doesn’t work, they are just gone.

The lesson? Test your pages, test your opt-in process, test everything you can.

#2 – Give ’em the good stuff

What happens right after a person hits the submit button on your opt-in form is critical. It is also the point where you may lose some people. Especially when you are using a double opt-in system that requires people to go to their email and click a link in a confirmation email. (And you should be using double opt-in – for so many reasons!)

Think about things from a new person’s perspective. They saw your offer, they were interested in your offer, and they filled out your form. Now what? Well, now they are probably expecting to get whatever it is they signed up for. This might be the actual content itself, or it might be a thank you page telling them to go click that confirmation link in their email.

In my opinion, the worst thing you can do is send people to a generic page that does nothing. Here’s one I landed on today. I signed up for a small teleseries, filled out my email address, hit submit, and landed here:

 

Not the best thank you page!

 

My first thought was, ‘Well, that’s not good’.

I didn’t get any information about the calls, I didn’t get any direction on how to get information about the calls. I didn’t get welcomed into a community. I didn’t get offered other ways to engage or learn or discover anything about this person or what they were offering.

I suppose they expected me to run to my email and look there. Which is okay for people like me, who have been around for a while, but what happens to people who don’t know to check their email? You are going to lose some of them. They won’t check their email right away, and by the time they do they have either forgotten your offer or they are not interested anymore. They might have even found help somewhere else!

This is a lost opportunity to welcome new people into your world! This offer of yours might be their first contact with you, so you want to do everything possible to make it easy for them. Don’t forget either, some of the people who find your offer might not be tech savvy and might not understand the whole email opt-in thing.

The important thing is that when someone hits that submit button, that something happens. Thank them. Either give them what they signed up for or tell them how to get what they signed up for. Don’t let potential clients get lost!

#3 – Don’t ask for too much information

The final tip I want to share is a big mistake that will push a lot of people away if you make it. Asking people to give too much information in order to get your offer or sign up for your event turns people off. What is too much information? Well, it depends. The key is to not ask for more than you need at this point in your relationship with this subscriber.

Don't ask for too much information!At the bare minimum, all you need is someone’s email address to add them to your list. But you should definitely ask for their first name. Giving your name and email to sign up for something has become the standard for online offers, and most people are used to and comfortable with doing so.

But when you go beyond that, when you begin asking for additional information, your opt-in rates will go down. Why are you asking for my phone number? Are you going to call me? Am I going to be added to some telemarketing list? Why do you need my physical address? Every additional piece of information you ask for is another opportunity for people to resist.

So unless you have a good reason to do so, you should resist the temptation to ask for phone numbers, or addresses, or anything else.

Make it easy for people to step into your world

You spend a lot of time and energy creating offers that will resonate with your people and draw them into your world. You owe it to yourself, and to the people you serve, to make it as easy as possible for them. Don’t make them jump through hoops.